Case Dismissed! Federal Court of Appeals Orders D.C. Federal District Court to Grant United States’ Motion to Dismiss Criminal Case Subsequent to Plea Agreement Admitting False Statements to Federal Bureau of Investigation

In re. Michael T. Flynn, No. 20-5143 (D.C. Cir.) Petition for writ of mandamus granted in part on June 24, 2020.


General Michael T. Flynn was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation in relation to contacts with foreign sources.  General Flynn plead guilty to lying to federal officers, testifying under oath that he was in fact guilty and had not been subjected to duress.  Months later the United States moved to dismiss the case against General Flynn, having concluded that any false statements made were not material to any investigation.

The United States District Court for the District of Columbia did not look kindly on the United States’ motion to dismiss, and in response invited amici submissions and scheduled hearings to determine whether he ought to find General Flynn guilty of perjury notwithstanding the United States no longer wishing to pursue the matter.

General Flynn’s counsel petitioned the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals for a Writ of Mandamus which was today granted in part.   The appellate court has ordered the trial court to dismiss the case, but the appellate court refused to transfer the case to another judge.  In light of these determinations, disputes about the engagement of an amicus to assist the trial judge were rendered moot.


The D.C. Circuit  opined that dismissals of criminal matters rest soundly with prosecutorial discretion.  Rule 48 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure has a limited “leave of court” requirement that is intended to protect against prosecutorial harassment.   United States . Fokker Services B.V., No. 15-1306 (D. D.C. 2016).

The court observed that this is not an extraordinary case in which judicial involvement in dismissal could be warranted.  General Flynn agrees with the prosecution, there is no evidence of harassment, and recently produced exculpatory evidence supports the Department of Justice’s view that the interviews with General Flynn in issue were not material to any prosecution.

Moreover, the appellate court concluded, harm to the prosecution in refusing to dismiss is not speculative, particularly in that the hearings proposed by the trial court would provide a foray into the deliberative processes of the Executive Branch.  It is right to attend to the interests of the Executive Branch, the court found, as the executive is not just any party, but is the branch responsible for criminal prosecutions.  Equally significant is that a trial court’s assumption of a supervisory role over the executive would not be a theoretical breach of the separation of powers, but would chill effective prosecutions.

Further, the trial court’s designation of an advocate for for the prosecution put the two coequal branches of government on a collision course.

The appellate court refused to rewrite the limited “leave of court” provision of Rule 48, F.R.Crim.P. to permit elaborate mic submissions and extensive hearings, finding that “[t]he district court has no mechanism by which it can maintain a prosecution in the absence of the Executive Branch moving forward.”  (Slip. Op. at 14.)

Dismissal cannot turn on what a judge independently thinks in in the public interest.  A court should not second guess except in an extreme case:  extensive, pershpas inquisitorial, inquiry in a non-extreme case would contravene Supreme Court precedent and would be inconsistent with  Article III powers.

The majority countered the dissent’s position that a writ of mandamus cannot issue until the trial court has acted, finding that an actual ruling on the motion to dismiss was not necessary where the court had already invited amici and scheduled hearings.

Dissenting Justice Wilkins opined that the majority wholly misdefies the issue at hand.  The question is not whether a court may deny a Rule 48 motion to dismiss but whether the court is precluded from making any inquiry at all.  The appell majority ruling that the district court overstepped its authority has been followed by the appellate court’s following suit, for there is no basis for the court to issue a writ of mandamus absent a discrete action by the district court.

The dissent found the majority’s reliance on Fokker disengenuous, for in that case, a deferred prosecution agreement, not dismissal was in issue.  Reliance on Fokker, Justice Wilkins found, “transforms dicta into dogma.”  (Slip Op. Dissent at p. 3, Part B).

The dissent expressed fear that the majority has read the public interest out of Rule 48.  The law is not as settled as the majority would say and it is not possible to say that petitioner has no other relief available, where it is clear that it exists.

The dissent offered that there is no reason, even in the absence of explicit authority, that a trial judge cannot enlist assistance in charting its course on a case.

Prosecutorial discretion cannot be made into an impenetrable shield.  The dissent observed that the appellate ruling decimates the discretion that resies in trial court’s concerning motions to dismiss.

This is particularly worrisome, Justice Wilkins found, where but months ago the statements now deemed ‘immaterial’ were said to have gone to “the heart of the government’s case.”  (Slip. Op. Dissent at p. 17).

2020 06 24 Opinion In re Michael T. Flynn

2020 06 24 Order in re Michael T. Flynn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Massachusetts Trial Court Considers the Constitutional Contours of End of Life Care

Kligler and another v. Attorney General Maura T. Healy and another, No. 2016-03254-F (December 31, 2019)


Two physicians, one terminally ill and one whose practice includes care for the terminally ill, sought declaratory relief upholding as constitutional the prescription of fatal doses of medication for patient self-administration, called Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) and upholding as constitutional discussion of such assistance and referrals to sources competent and capable of providing such prescriptions.

The physicians were wholly successful in obtaining, with no opposition from the state, the court’s opinion that the discussion of assistance in dying and the making of referrals to obtain such assistance is protected by the First Amendment.  In that no prosecution is likely to ensue from such discussions, the court declined to enjoin the state from so doing.

The court declined to find the characterization of medical assistance in dying as involuntary homicide to be unconstitutional or to find the application of involuntary manslaughter statutes to such aid to be unconstitutionally vague.  The United States Supreme Court has twice stated that substantive due process principles do not protect a physician’s right to participate in assisting in dying. Moreover, concepts of criminal law have long traditions leaving no one to guess what is proscribed within the meaning of “involuntary manslaughter.”

In the absence of a fundamental constitutional right, the state need only show that the prohibition of prescriptive assistance in dying serves and is reasonably related to an important government interest.  The preservation of life, the prevention of suicide, the protection of vulnerable populations, and the maintenance of sound medical practices and ethics are such interests, the court observed. In light of the irrevocability of administration of fatal medications, the court concluded that the proscription against such prescriptions is not unreasonable.

The court rejected the physicians’ arguments that a patient’s ingestion of the fatal doses of medications would serve as an intervening cause of death, relieving the physician of liability, where death is the known outcome at the time of issuing the prescription.  Nor was the court persuaded that the absence of coercion could change the result where, as before, death would be the known and intended outcome of the act of prescription.

The court likewise rejected equal protection challenges, observing that the law can and does respect the privacy and autonomy rights that attach to the refusal of medical treatment while concomitantly finding no corollary in any right to administer death.  Moreover, the active prescription of lethal doses of drugs differs from the permissible cessation of extraordinary treatments, the voluntary cessation of eating and drinking, or the provision of palliative pain management. The first produces death as a result of active physician intervention,  while the latter permits death to ensue as a natural result of underlying disease or debility.

The trial court noted that as social thought changes, so too may the law.  The trial court articulated its decision according to current precedent, yet noted change has occurred in the thirty years since the controlling decisions issued.  Of equal if not greater importance, the court concluded, the determination of the parameters of end of life care are not best addressed by the courts, but should be undertaken by the legislature.  

2019 12 31 Kligler v. Healy (Suffolk Sup. Ct.)