The House of God v. The House of the Rising Sun: Vigorous Dissents Accompany Supreme Court’s Denial of Injunctive Relief Where Nevada Church Alleges Pandemic Measures Restrict Churches More Than Casinos

Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley v. Sisolak, Governor of Nevada, No. 17A1070 (July 24, 2020).


A rural Nevada church asked the Supreme Court to enjoin state pandemic emergency measures that impose a flat numeric limit on church attendees while commercial entities such as casinos may operate at a percentage of capacity, permitting close contact for extended periods. 

The Supreme Court denied, without opinion, Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley’s request.  Four justices submitted three dissenting opinions. 

Justices Alito, Thomas and Kavanaugh would grant relief, given the inexplicable and unsupported discrepancy in treatment between secular and religious gatherings as well as the irreparable harm presumed to flow from deprivation of First Amendment rights.  

The justices observed that while “…a public health emergency does not give Governors and others carte blanche to disregard the Constitution for as long as the medical problem persists.”  (Alito dissent, p. 3.)  Particularly as time has passed since the emergency initially arose, and new information may permit revisions, the issue of exigency has diminished while the impact of discrimination against religion has continued unabated.  

The state’s actions fare no better under speech analysis.  While the state may posit that important viewpoints are advanced during permitted public protests, this overlooks the critical truth that the constitution does not permit preferring one viewpoint over another.

Justice Gorsuch wrote a separate dissent, offering his view that the Calvary Chapel case was “simple,” in that “…there is no world in which the Constitution permits Nevada to favor Caesar’s Palace over Calvary Chapel.”  (Gorsuch dissent, p. 1.) 

Justice Kavanaugh wrote separately in dissent to emphasize that the state offered no plausible justification for its differential treatment of commercial activity and religious gatherings.  .  Justice Kavanaugh presented a primer addressing the nature and sources of religious disputes grounded in real or perceived differences in treatment of religion and other activities, and reviewing precedent addressing these cases.

Just Lawful Observes:  The concern with protracted state invocation of emergency powers permeates the dissent here, a concern that was not as apparent in May of this year, where the Court denied injunctive relief to a California church in a manner deferential to the state’s exercise of emergency powers to inhibit viral contagion during a pandemic.  South Bay United Pentacostal v. Newsom, Governor of California, No. 19a1044 (May 29, 2020). Although there were perceived differences between non-church and church activities, none were found to be inconsistent with the Free Exercise Clause. 

Calvary Chapel v. Sisolak, Governor of Nevada: Denial of Injunctive Relief and Dissenting Opinions. No. 19a1070 (July 24, 2020).

South Bay United Pentacostal v Newsom, Governor of California. No. 19a1044 (May 29, 2020).

 

 

 

Viral Publication and Opinion in a Divided Nation: CNN Settles with High School Student Said to Have Been Defamed by Broadcast of Video of Confrontation with Native American Protester on the National Mall

Sandmann v. Cable News Network, et al., No. 2:19-cv-00031 (E.D. Ky.).  Related matter:  Sandmann v. Washington Post Company, No. 2:19-cv-00019 (E.D. Ky.)


Nicholas Sandmann visited the National Mall on January 18, 2019, joining with fellow Catholic High School students in a March for Life event.  There Sandmann was confronted, face to face, by Nathan Phillips, a Native American participating in a separate event, subsequent to what appears to have been a series of taunts exchanged among protest groups. 

The video confrontation, published nationally by mainstream media, including Cable News Network (CNN), precipitated officials, news commentators, church officials, and others to characterize Sandmann, shown in a “MAGA” (“Make America Great Again”) hat, a symbol of the current executive administration, as a racist. 

Sandmann filed complaints against several media entities separately, two of which, against the Washington Post Company and CNN, have been assigned to the same senior federal judge in the Eastern District of Kentucky.  

Following dismissal with prejudice of the complaint against the Washington Post, Sandmann was granted reconsideration which set aside the dismissal in part and granted Sandmann leave to amend his complaint against the Washington Post.  

In October, 2019, CNN’s motion was denied to dismiss and Sandmann’s motion to amend his complaint were granted. 

A proposed discovery and pretrial schedule was submitted to the court in the Eastern District of Kentucky in both cases on  January 3, 2020. The parties to the CNN case reported publicly on January 7, 2020 that settlement with CNN without trial, on undisclosed terms, had been reached. 

Whether the settlement signals a change of course among other media defendants will likely unfold in the not distant future. 

Notwithstanding — and perhaps particularly in light of — the rhetoric accompanying this case, the legal issues, while well grounded in history, seem to call for particular examination in the age of instant worldwide publication and the simultaneous formation of opinions.  Whether a matter is one of fact, and therefore actionable in defamation, or of opinion, and therefore not, is a longstanding principle. Whether this is changed or modified or subject to new refinement in the age of instant worldwide transmittal and simultaneous formation and publication of opinions remains to be seen.

CNN’s account of the settlement may be found at:

CNN Settles Lawsuit Stemming from Viral Video Controversy

The opinion dismissing Sandmann’s initial complaint against the Washington Post, of some historic note, may be found here:

2019 07 26 Sandmann v. WP Company__Memorandum and Order Granting Motion to Dismiss

Supreme Court Justices to Consider Reviewing Whether Transit Authority’s Ban on Religious Advertising on Buses Violates First Amendment

Archdiocese of Washington v. Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority, et al., No. 18-1455.  Scheduled for Conference October 1, 2019.


Today marks the Supreme Court’s official ‘back to work’ day, exemplified by the characterization of the first ensemble of the justices for the term as “the long conference,” in which the accumulated and prospective business before the Court demands extensive and intensive attention.

Among the many petitions of note is the Archdiocese of Washington’s (ADW) request that the Court grant its petition for certiorari to determine whether the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority’s (WMATA) prohibition on religious advertisements on its buses violates the First Amendment. 

The dispute between the church and state entities arose in 2017, when WMATA refused to permit publication of a “Find the Perfect Gift” advertisement intended for public viewing in anticipation of the Christmas holiday.  Although similar advertisements had been accepted and were widely seen within the WMATA ridership area, in 2015 WMATA promulgated regulations banning “Issue” messages, including political and religious views. WMATA reasoned that such messages stirred controversy and management of public concerns in reviewing complaints consumed an inordinate amount of resources. 

The Archdiocese argues that the Court’s precedent compels the conclusion that WMATA rules impermissibly suppress speech, notwithstanding the opinion of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to the contrary.

The Archdiocese argues that WMATA’s rules cannot survive review under either the First Amendment or the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.  As WMATA has admitted that it permits messages with secular messages but not with religious messages, WMATA has engaged in impermissible viewpoint discrimination.

The Archdiocese disputes  the position that the exclusion of the “subject” of religion avoids constitutional offense.  All manner of commentary about Christmas is permitted except religious commentary: this is exactly what is meant by viewpoint discrimination.

Particularly where religion enjoys specific constitutional protections, the imposition of speech burdens or prohibitions is unacceptable.  Adopting the government’s view would carry with it the potential to banish religious speech from all forums, a constitutionally unacceptable result.

The Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority disputes the Archdiocese’s argument, asserting that its regulation, intended to avoid controversy and its associated costs, is a reasonable viewpoint neutral subject limitation applicable to a non-public forum.  WMATA counters the church’s arguments about speech suppression with the prediction that if the regulation is struck down, then all advertisements opposing religion will be required to be accepted, to the detriment of the government’s ability to manage its transit authority and to the detriment of its ridership.  

WMATA cautions the court that adopting the Archdiocese’s position would destroy the forum analyses applied to permissible and impermissible restrictions on speech in public forums.  

WMATA argues that there is no Religious Freedom Restoration Act claim to be reviewed, as RFRA does not apply to the states, and WMATA is an inter-state project comprising of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. 

JustLawful Prognostication:  “Definitely maybe.”

The Court could grant certiorari if it determines it important to weed the thicket of controversy and misunderstanding that have attached to analyses of permissible speech limitations, including forum analyses.  There is little doubt that this is a significant issue on both speech and religious freedom points.

It is equally possible that, given that the appellate court decision in issue concerns preliminary relief and not a determination on the merits, that the Court will avoid tackling these important concepts in the absence of a more developed record.  

An eleventh hour tipping point may have emerged.  Just days before the long conference, the Archdiocese submitted a supplementary brief arguing that a recent decision by the Third Circuit striking down regulations not dissimilar from the WMATA rules creates a split in circuit decisions making more urgent the Supreme Court’s grant of certiorari.

Briefs in Support and Opposition to Petition for Certiorari

2019 05 19 Petition for Writ of Certiorari

2019 07 22 WMATA Opposition to Peittion for Certiorari

2019 08 06 Reply of Archdiocese v WMATA

2019 09 26 ADW Supplemental Brief in Support of Petition for Certiorari

Amicus Submissions

2019 06 20 Amicus Brief Foundation for Moral Law

2019 06 21 Amicus Brief Christian Legal Society et al

2019 06 21 Amicus Brief of National Association of Evangelicals et al

Opinions of D.C. Circuit and U.S.D.C. D.C.

Archdiocese of Wash. v. Wash. Metro. Area Transit Auth. & Paul J. Wiedefeld, 910 F.3d 1248(Mem) (D.C. Cir., 2018)

Archdiocese of Wash. v. Wash. Metro. Area Transit Auth., 897 F.3d 314 (D.C. Cir., 2018)

Archdiocese of Wash. v. Wash. Metro. Area Transit Auth., 281 F. Supp. 3d 88 (D. D.C., 2017)

Opinion of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals

Ne. Pa. Freethought Soc’y v. Cnty. of Lackawanna Transit Sys.No. 18-2743 (3rd Cir., 2019)

 

Federal Court in Maryland Upholds Law Precluding Licensed Professionals from Practicing “Conversion” Therapy on Minors

Doyle, et al.  v. Hogan, et al., No. 19-cv-00190 (D. Md.) Motion to Dismiss Granted September 20, 2019.


A Maryland statute governing the provision of mental health services precludes provision of “conversion” therapy to minors.  Violation of the statute carries the risk of professional censure. 

“Conversion” therapy is the name applied to interventions intended to reorient an individual’s sexual identity, presumably from same sex or other preferences to heterosexual interest.  “Conversion” therapy has received substantial disapprobation from professional groups, and some professionals advocate that even if there were evidence to support the efficacy of conversion therapy, it should not be offered to minors.

Plaintiff Doyle asserted in federal court that the preclusion of delivery of conversion therapy to minors unconstitutionally impaired his speech rights and his religious liberty. 

The court disagreed, finding that while the conversion therapy involved speech, the administration of therapy was in fact conduct outside the realm of constitutional concern.  

Moreover, the court observed, the therapist’s freedom to speak of or about conversion therapy remains untouched by the statute.  A mental health services provider may provide information about or express an opinion about conversion therapy without fear. 

Central to the court’s determination was the inability of minors to provide informed consent for treatment. As the state interest in the health and well being of minors is at least substantial, if not compelling, imposing limitations on professional conduct to which the minor is legally unable to consent is not unreasonable.  In that minor children are not capable of autonomously exercising informed consent and in that others may exercise consent on their behalf, the state is not wrong in protecting minors from treatment to which they could not accede as a matter of law.

The court concluded that as therapist’s speech interests are not within the statute’s purview, neither were free exercise rights abridged, as the prohibition on “conversion” therapy for minors is a law of general applicability which does not substantially interfere with any belief or practice of religion.

The statute applies only to those who are licensed practitioners within Maryland.

Doyle v. Hogan (D. MD.) September 20, 2019